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Karen

We just discovered your WildBrine Sauerkraut and love it!
A concern I had though was that I couldn’t find any information on the container about how long the sauerkraut lasts once the jar had been opened. I did find it on your website with the three rules for keeping it fresh.
It would be very helpful if that information was printed on your container.
Thank you for a healthy, delicious and convenient food!

The wild Bunch

Hi Karen – Thanks so much for the love! If only we had more room on the label to put all the info that customers would like to see! We try to include as much helpful information as possible on our website though. Glad you found what you needed.

Shari

Regarding the salt brine I can make to add to what’s already in the jar of sauerkraut, I’m wondering if a course salt (that I normally grind) will work without grinding it. It’s called Selina Celtic Sea Salt. I also have a Himalayan Cooking Salt, Ava Jane’s Colima Sea Salt, and Redmond Real Salt, which is mined. Thank you, Shari

The wild Bunch

Thanks for the question Shari! We suggest adding a little water to the kraut if you need the liquid to get to the level of the solids.

Billy

Awesome article! Thanks!
By the way, if I eat all the kimchi out of the jar, can I then put more vegetables into the jar and re-pickle them?
Also, what books would you recommend on making kimchi or fermentation in general?

The wild Bunch

Hi Billy – This is not recommended for these reasons: 1) Probiotics tire and die off after a while. Using the brine means using micro-organisms that are on the down slope of their lives. Start with fresh vegetables every time to get fresh, vibrant organisms; 2) Carrying over a “starter” from one batch to another risks not being able to control/sort good (or better) batches from each other; in the food business this is definitely a food safety no-no as there is no control/trace-ability between batches; and 3) the complex flavor of fermented foods comes from the fermentation progressing from more neutral pHs (i.e. acidity) to lower PH’s (higher acidity). As the ferment goes down this path, different organisms are more prevalent at the various pH’s. All of those organisms contribute different flavor notes. So to get a symphony of flavor in the end product, always start with fresh produce and let the ferment progress at its own pace. The right pace is set by providing the right environment (65-70F temp), the right amount of salt for kimchis & sauerkraut (~2% by weight), and an anaerobic environment via “weighing down” the solids.

On books on fermentation – refer to Sandor Katz’s books, although I would insert a little more science in some recipes to be safe: 1) always ferment using salt since no salt fermenting is not as safe; and 2) always ferment to a pH below 3.7.

– Chris Glab, Co-Founder of wildbrine

Sally

I have an unopened jar of recently purchased sauerkraut.
Fridge died, but kraut got moved to neighbours fridge while still fairly chilled.
Got fridge fixed and brought kraut back.
Fridge died overnight and nothing was cool come morning :/
The jar is still sealed, and it didnt get hot exactly, but would a jar of seals sauerkraut still be safe to eat if say it was at room temp for 4-6 hours?

The wild Bunch

Hi Sally – Sounds like that fridge is doing you no favors! If the kraut was only out of refrigeration for 4-6 hours, then it should be fine to eat. But the added heat might have restarted a bit of second fermentation, which can change its texture and flavor a bit. But this short of time likely didn’t affect it. Hope this helps!